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WALTON, Ky. (AP) — An unvaccinated student in Kentucky will get his day in court after suing because he can't participate in extracurricular activities during a chickenpox outbreak.

WASHINGTON (AP) — About 4 percent of women incarcerated in state prisons across the U.S. were pregnant when they were jailed, according to a new study released Thursday that researchers hope will help lawmakers and prisons better consider the health of women behind bars.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are closing in on a way to help young boys undergoing cancer treatment preserve their future fertility — and the proof is the first monkey born from the experimental technology.

Residents near a petrochemical storage terminal in the Houston suburb of Deer Park were warned to shelter in place for several hours on Thursday after elevated levels of benzene were detected in the air.

WASHINGTON (AP) — A growing majority of Americans want greater government spending on health care, and the increase is being driven by both Democrats and Republicans.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — The Trump administration and coal industry allies are insisting that a federal black lung trust fund will continue to pay benefits to sick miners despite a drastic cut in funding.

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Philadelphia health officials say they now believe 74 people have contracted mumps at Temple University. City Department of Health spokesman James Garrow said Wednesday there are 15 confirmed cases and 59 probable cases, all but three of them in Philadelphia.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicines proven to treat opioid addiction remain vastly underused in the U.S., the nation's top medical advisers said Wednesday.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth's ultimate survivors can weather extreme heat, cold, radiation and even the vacuum of space. Now the U.S.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Unsafe drinking water, not climate change, is the world's most immediate public health issue, Environmental Protection Agency administrator Andrew Wheeler contended Wednesday.

COEBURN, Va. (AP) — Former coal miner John Robinson's bills for black lung treatments run $4,000 a month, but the federal fund he depends on to help cover them is being drained of money because of inaction by Congress and the Trump administration.

Houston authorities on Tuesday assured residents that there were no measureable air-quality problems from a petrochemical storage terminal fire despite a huge black plume of smoke that could be seen for miles.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco is trying to crack down on electronic cigarettes that critics say aggressively target kids, with an official on Tuesday proposed what's believed to be the first U.S.

LONDON (AP) — Smoking high-potency marijuana every day could increase the chances of developing psychosis by nearly five times, according to the biggest-ever study to examine the impact of pot on psychotic disorder rates.

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first drug specifically developed for severe depression after childbirth.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Roundup weed killer was a substantial factor in a California man's cancer, a jury determined Tuesday in the first phase of a trial that attorneys said could help determine the fate of hundreds of similar lawsuits.

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. (AP) — Laura Levine says she never smoked a cigarette or touched a drink until age 35. Then the mother of five tried heroin, and she was hooked.

GENEVA (AP) — A panel convened by the World Health Organization said it would be "irresponsible" for scientists to use gene editing for reproductive purposes, but stopped short of calling for a ban.

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump appears to be oblivious to the threat of white nationalism. Following a deadly mosque shooting in New Zealand, he said white supremacy isn't a rising danger.

EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — Three decades ago, Lori Ann Bourgeois was guarding fighter jets at an air base. After her discharge, she fell into drug addiction.

WASHINGTON (AP) — A huge study suggests the Apple Watch can detect a worrisome irregular heartbeat at least sometimes — but experts say more work is needed to tell if using wearable technology to screen for heart problems really helps.

Surgery for certain bad heart valves may soon become a thing of the past. New studies suggest it's OK and often better to have a new valve placed through a tube into an artery instead.

The latest U.S. research on eggs won't go over easy for those who can't eat breakfast without them. Adults who ate about 1 ½ eggs daily had a slightly higher risk of heart disease than those who ate no eggs.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency on Friday banned consumer use of a popular but deadly paint stripper but stopped short of also banning commercial use of the product by tradespeople.